5 things you need to know about puppy nutrition

Jul 2, 2022 7:30:54 PM

5 things you need to know about puppy nutrition

 

When you take on a puppy’s health and wellbeing, its nutrition is a huge part of your responsibility. Nutrition covers everything that contributes to your puppy’s growth and development, specifically her bones, teeth, healthy vision, coat, organs, joints, and muscles.

 

“At times during their rapid growth and development from weaning until approximately 4 to 6 months of age, puppies, depending on the breed size, require approximately three times more calories, proteins, vitamins and minerals per kilogram of body weight as adult dogs of the same breed size and a higher nutrient intake to support their growing bodies.”

[Source: The Kennel Club]

 

Just like adults, the growing phase of a puppy’s life requires the right ingredients as so many amazing things are happening as they get bigger (and bigger!). Making sure you provide the best nutrition means you are laying some excellent foundations for the future health of your adult dog.

 

  • The ‘puppy stage’ depends entirely on your dog’s breed. Whilst it’s true to say that the rapid growth period might start to slow down after 6 months, many breeds continue to grow for up to 2 years. Larger breeds have a longer growth period and so should remain on specially formulated growth food for the entire time. The nutritional requirements of your puppy continue to be greater than those of a fully matured dog until the growth stage is complete. Talk to your breeder or do your research to understand your own dog’s needs.

 

  • The six essential nutrients your puppy needs are: carbohydrates, proteins, fat, vitamins, minerals, and water. You will find the first five in good ‘complete’ puppy food and you provide water separately – always fresh and always available. Carefully read the label of any puppy food you invest in and choose wisely as it is best practice to stick with the same brand and routine. We have a downloadable leaflet that gives details of our complete puppy food with a detailed ingredient list – link below.

 

  • The quantity of food is important too. Feeding the right amount is something to be aware of. Most of us are not always fully accurate with feeding and can often be prompted to alter quantities if we notice our pet getting a little fatter or looking too slim. We don’t have this luxury with a pup as we don’t know what their end shape will be. To avoid any doubt, scales are your best friend – keep weighing and feeding in line with the recommended amounts. Trophy’s Nutritional Advisers can help with this and offer a free weighing service which you will be grateful for as your puppy changes throughout the first few months. Don’t be tempted to overfeed in a bid to accelerate the growing phase – it can be dangerous and add undue strain on your puppy’s organs and joints.

 

  • Treats should be 10% or less of your puppy’s diet. Treats always sound indulgent and a little bit naughty but feeding small, healthy, tasty rewards can be a beneficial part of their nutrition. Creating good habits with highly nutritional treats means they are less likely to beg for food or associate human food with their own. There is a mountain of treats to choose from so check the labels carefully, never feed rawhide and consider baking your own! We loved the sound of ‘Sally’s Peanut Butter Bacon Dog Treats’ – for the dogs of course! Link below.

 

  • DHA (Omega 3 essential fatty acid) is vital for neurological and retinol function. This ingredient, typically derived from fish, provides the good fats your puppy needs for brain and eye development. It also aids its central nervous system and can ease some allergies, particularly skin complaints. It can be added as a supplement or you should ideally choose a puppy food, like the Trophy Super Premium puppy food, which has DHA included.

 

Feeding your puppy and helping her to grow into a fit and well adult is a wonderful thing to observe and doubtless you will record every step through photos and video. Use these as a diary to chart her progress and note any changes in her appearance. By following these guidelines, you should only see a happy, beautiful pet who loves her food!

 

References:

https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/health-and-dog-care/health/health-and-care/a-z-of-health-and-care-issues/puppy-nutrition/

https://www.trophypetfoods.co.uk/products/details/1/super-premium-grainfree-puppy-food

https://sallysbakingaddiction.com/homemade-peanut-butter-dog-treats/

Back

Recent Blogs

Choosing kennels with confidence

Choosing kennels with confidence

If you’re going on holiday you want your beloved dog to enjoy a mini break too, right? It’s important to know that, whilst you’re away from home, your pet is happy and being well cared for. Instead of it being a leap into the unknown, here is our handy guide to choosing great kennels – so you can both relax and enjoy a change of scenery.

5 top tips for large breed dog owners

Big dogs make the most loyal, loving and fantastic pets but there are a few things to know before you commit to sharing your life (and your space!) with these huge hounds. We’ve made a list of five of the most important things to appreciate but be sure to ask your breeder or rescue centre for their advice too.

Care for your working dog

Care for a working dog is much the same as caring for any dog but there are some additional considerations in terms of diet and joint care. A dog who is regularly expending lots of energy will need extra calories in and it’s important that these are the right ones. Also the joints and muscles of an energetic, hard-working dog will need extra attention – again in the form of the correct supplements and diet. Trophy has all of this covered of course and our Nutritional Advisers are on hand to help and advise should you need it. 

Thinking of adopting a rescue dog?

The term ‘rescue dog’ covers any number of situations where a dog needs a new home.

Most commonly, family circumstances change and the family pet becomes displaced and ends up in a rehoming centre through no fault of their own. Sometimes owners divorce, emigrate, need care-based accommodation or, sadly, die. There are also instances, all too often, where dog ownership doesn’t meet expectations or a dog/owner match doesn’t work out. They can sometimes be bought as gifts, and land in a household that is simply not ready for the responsibility.

Explore our range of products

Please select an animal to view our Trophy pet food range or treats and accessories